Broadcast Tech News – Norway’s Virzt unveils “teleport” virtual interview tech

Vizrt, a Norwegian-based software-defined visual storytelling solutions provider, is offering a glimpse into the sci-fi future of remote live interviews. Using IP and the built-in Fusion renderer in the Viz Engine 4.1, two individuals located in separate countries appear to be in the same room having a conversation in a live, one-on-one TV talk show format on online platform Vizr.TV. Host Chris Black appears seated next to guest Gerhard Lang, CTO for the Vizrt Group, however Black is at Vizrt headquarters in Bergen, Norway while Lang is in the Vizrt office in Vomp, Austria more than 2,000 kilometres away. A virtual set provides a common background. Two Matrox Monarch Edge devices were used to send and receive SRT streams from Norway to Austria. Using Viz Engine 4.1, only two frames of latency for audio and video, in and out, in both SDI and IP mode were introduced into the stream. The low latency provided an IP stream for reference monitors and for the final live production. 

RealmSmith.tv is using Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera 4Ks to live stream its tabletop gaming series “Into the Mist” on Twitch, and relying on DaVinci Resolve Studio’s cut page to quickly edit each show’s highlights for YouTube. The Toronto-based live streaming and tabletop gaming company, which started in a garage two years ago, features improvised live play of Dungeons & Dragons’ “Curse of Strahd” campaign setting. RealmSmith.tv uses two Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera 4Ks to capture front shots, one pointing at the Dungeon Master and the other to capture a wider shot of the entire table of six players. The other two cameras are used on either side of the table, looking across and over players’ shoulders. Additionally, RealmSmith.tv uses an ATEM Television Studio HD to switch between the cameras and map out sequences of camera changes and animations. 

SMPTE, the Society of Motion Picture and Television Engineers, has announced changes to its educational programming designed to make it easier for industry professionals to keep up with the latest technology and learn new skills. Virtual course prices have been cut by 50%, while SMPTE tech webcasts are now available online to everyone. The society has also opened a collection of freely accessible SMPTE Standards and articles from the SMPTE Motion Imaging Journal. It’s working with local SMPTE Sections to get meetings streamed so members can stay on top of technology, no matter where they are. SMPTE Toronto will stream its next session Mar. 12. Attendees are asked to register.