Canadian Journalism & Awards News In Brief – Concordia students to protest unpaid internships

Ontario Association of Broadcasters

Concordia University’s Journalism department is joining thousands of Quebec students who’ve moved to strike to protest unpaid internships. Concordia joins McGill’s School of Social Work as the second English university to get involved in the student effort. A strike will take place once a minimum of 20,000 students from at least three regions of the province have taken up the strike mandate.

The CJF-Facebook Journalism Project News Literacy Award, is open for applications until Feb. 22. The award, which carries a $10,000 prize, celebrates journalistic efforts that encourage Canadians to understand and assess the quality of news. Last year’s inaugural award went to Radio-Canada for its weekly television program Corde sensible that confronted misinformation and false stories where they flourish – on social media.

The Canadian Journalism Foundation (CJF), together with CBC News, is now accepting applications to its CJF-CBC Indigenous Journalism Fellowships program. The annual fellowships provide an opportunity for two early-career Indigenous journalists, with one-to-10 years’ experience, to explore Indigenous issues while being hosted for one month at CBC’s Indigenous Unit in Winnipeg. The application deadline is Feb. 22. Fellows receive a $3,000 stipend, while the CJF covers travel and accommodation costs, a per diem for meals and other reasonable expenses. Last year’s recipients were Ntawnis Piapot and Jasmine Kabatay. For her fellowship, Piapot, a Nehiyaw Iskwew from the Piapot Cree Nation in southern Saskatchewan, explored varying levels of commitment by universities to Indigenization. Read about her experience here. She’s joined CBC Saskatoon as a reporter. Kabatay, an Anishinaabe journalist from Seine River First Nation in northwestern Ontario, explored the challenges and confusion faced by those using Indian status cards. Read about her experience here. Kabatay splits her time between CBC Hamilton and CBC Kitchener-Waterloo as part of an internship.

The Canadian Journalism Foundation (CJF) and The Canadian Women’s Foundation, are encouraging journalists who highlight women’s equality issues to apply for The Landsberg Award. Named for Canadian journalist, author and social activist Michele Landsberg, the award was established to increase women’s voices and awareness of women’s issues in the media, and recognizes a working journalist—staff or freelance—doing exceptional research, analysis and reporting through a gender lens about women’s issues. Journalists working in print, broadcast and online news reporting are eligible to apply by Feb. 22. Last year’s winner was The Globe and Mail’s Robyn Doolittle, in recognition of her “Unfounded” investigation exposing a pattern of mishandling sexual assault cases by police across the country. The winner, who will be selected by Landsberg and a jury of working journalists, will be recognized at the CJF Awards on June 13 in Toronto.

Atlantic Journalism Awards (AJAs) submissions are due at midnight on Feb. 1. Atlantic Canadian journalists are reminded to submit their newspaper, magazine, radio, television, online stories and images to the 39th AJAs, which will take place May 11 at the Halifax Marriott Harbourfront Hotel. New categories include Excellence in Digital Journalism; Breaking News/Daily; and Excellence in Digital Journalism – Enterprise/Long FormCategory descriptions, and other information can be found at AJAs.ca


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