Brodie Fenlon, CBC’s senior director of Daily News and Bureaus, is this year’s recipient of the Digital Publishing Leadership Award

Brodie Fenlon

Brodie Fenlon, CBC’s senior director of Daily News and Bureaus, is this year’s recipient of the Digital Publishing Leadership Award, which honours an individual whose career contributions to Canadian digital publishing deserve recognition and celebration. Brodie will be presented with his award at the DPA Soirée in Toronto on May 29. Brodie spent four years at The Globe and Mail before becoming managing editor of news at The Huffington Post Canada where played a strategic role in launching the first international edition of the U.S. website. At the CBC, Brodie has overseen the launch of new iOS and Android apps, the mobile site, and a number of interactive tools and templates.

Monika Bickert

Facebook has published the internal guidelines the social platform uses to enforce its standards policy determining what does and doesn’t belong. Monika Bickert, vice-president of Global Policy Management, says Facebook decided to publish the guidelines to help people understand where they draw the line on nuanced issues, and to make it easier to obtain feedback so those guidelines can be improved as social norms and language evolve. The 27-pages of Community Standards spell out which groups are banned from Facebook (mass murderers, terrorists, human traffickers, organized hate or violence); markers for objectionable content; and respect for intellectual property rights, among other policy rationale.

Bell is investing more than $100 million to bring its all-fibre optic network to the City of Oshawa. The Oshawa network is part of Bell’s plan to deploy all-fibre connections to an additional 1.3 million homes and businesses throughout the GTA/905 region. Working closely with the Oshawa Power & Utilities Commission (OPUC) as well as local contractors Telecon for fibre installation, the deployment will include more than 240 kilometres of new fibre installed underground and on several hundred Bell and OPUC poles. The all-fibre connections are expected to be accessible starting this fall.

CBS All Access streaming service is now available in Canada, ahead of what was an anticipated June launch. The service, which costs $5.99 a month, boasts more than 7,500 commercial-free episodes on demand, and the ability to live stream CBSN and CBS News’ 24/7 streaming news service. Canada marks its first international expansion.